MCGives! CAMPAIGN PROVIDES MATCHING FUNDS FOR DONATIONS

mc gives logo grey

AWAG is once again part of the Monterey County Gives Campaign. From now until the end of the year, donations made through this program will be eligible for a percentage matching grant.

We send out a BIG thank you to Dr. Shawn Borges, DC who donated $500 and La Mia Cucina Restaurant who donated $100 as a challenge grant to encourage others to give.

Visit this site to make your donation today and help us keep pets and their people together!!

https://www.montereycountygives.com/nonprofit/animal-welfare-assistance-group/

 

AWAG Reaches Out to Fire Evacuees With Pets

Hearing of the evacuations due to a raging fire in the Tassahara/Cachagua area, AWAG rose to the occasion on Sunday and put together doggie “go” bags.  They included 5 servings of food, treats, a toy, water and a bowl for folks who had to leave home with their pets. We realize that you don’t always have time to get these things together. Anyone needing help with food or other items for their dogs or cats should reach out to us at 831-659-2156.doggie go bags

Join us August 8th at PAW-DI GRAS !! A Party for Pets and their People

AWAG PawdiGras 5.47x8Join us for a fun day of games, contests, vendors, a raffle and silent auction and more!!

For more information, email us at info@animalwelfare.org

Show off your fur baby on the new AWAG van!

Animal Welfare Assistance Group has recently purchased a van. A 2014 Ford Transit Connect wagon to help with our mission. We are going to “wrap” the vehicle with graphics so it will be a mobile billboard of sorts.  If you would like to see your dog or cat on the AWAG van, for a donation of $250 or more, we will put your pets photo on the van. On average, the wrap last about 3 years. Would’t it be fun to see you beloved fur baby larger in life all over Monterey County? Drop us a line at info@animalwelfare.com for more information!

 

New name, Same great organization!

Animal Welfare Information and Assistance is now Animal Welfare Assistance Group!! Why the change? We found people had a hard time remembering our name or our initials. But Animal Welfare Assistance Group has initial that spell A-WAG. This helps people remember our name and also ties in the name of our benefit store, Tailwaggers.  We are still the same great group with the same mission, just a “new and improved” name.

 

Spirit Marshall

Spirit Marshall

Spirit Marshall is a 5 year old neutered chihuahua boy. Spirit’s mom, Valerie Marshall, contacted AWAG because she was concerned with Spirit’s bad breath and the heavy tartar on his teeth. Spirit was taken to Monterey Animal Hospital where he was sedated and anesthetized for his dental cleaning. Spirit had a “baby tooth” that had not fallen out so that was removed and his teeth where scaled and polished. Spirit’s mom was also educated on how to brush Spirit’s teeth. With the tooth and tartar gone there will be less bacteria and inflammation, leaving Spirit healthier and happier.

 

From Laura and Wally in Pacific Grove

From Laura and Wally in Pacific Grove

Dear precious people at Animal Welfare Assistance Group. I just want to thank you again so very much for helping me financially when my cat “Sunny” was dying of cancer (in February and March 2012). I love you all so much. I loved my cat just as much as my husband, mother or anyone. I don’t know what I would have done without your assistance. From the bottom of our hearts, thank you for helping us in our time of need. And thank you for making it so our dear loved one, Sunny, didn’t have to suffer. It’s people like you that make life precious!

All our love, Laura Campbell and Wally Campbell

Dogs with Yellow Ribbons

Dogs with Yellow Ribbons

DOGS WITH YELLOW RIBBONS ALERT ALL TO GIVE THE DOG SOME EXTRA SPACE

Have you noticed a dog with a yellow ribbon on their collar or harness? Chances are it’s not just decorative. The Yellow Dog Project is a global movement for dog owners. The yellow ribbon identifies the dog as one who “needs space”.

A “Yellow Dog” is not necessarily aggressive, but more often are dogs who have issues of fear, pain from a recent surgery, or is a rescue or shelter dog that has not yet had a lot of socialization or training.

The Yellow Dog Project wants to educate people about the appropriate ways to approach or make contact with a dog. That means that a dog is approached only with permission of the dog owner, whether or not the dog is a “yellow dog”. They also seek to promote the use of yellow ribbons to identify yellow dogs needing extra space.

Parents should instruct tell their children to always ask before approaching or petting any dog they see in public. If you see a dog wearing a yellow ribbon, respect the space around the dog and be sure to ask their owner before trying to approach the dog in any fashion, for the safety and well-being of both the dog and you.